Archive for June, 2009

Everything stops for these Teapots!

Posted in ART, DESIGN, TEAPOTS - A HOMAGE TO UNUSUAL TEAPOTS with tags , , on June 29, 2009 by echostains

These highly original teapots from ceramicist Ray Bub are absolutely amazing!  I’ve never seen anything quite like these before.

enter the Water Dragon by Ray Bub

enter the Water Dragon by Ray Bub

The artist has really thought out some of them: others seem to have evolved: he seems to have just gone with gone with creative  flow (so to speak).  The results are amazing.  This one (above) is full of fluidity and movement. (and thats without the tea!)

mountain gorillas recumbent ring teapot by  ray bub

mountain gorillas recumbent ring teapot by ray bub

The aritst gives a  detailed journey of his teapots: from their conception to their execution.  His techniques and glazing procedures are outlined here, along with lots of other amazing works.

torn open rough rusty_pillow teapot by  ray bub (don'tyou just love the title as well as the teapot!)

torn open rough rusty_pillow teapot by ray bub (don'tyou just love the title as well as the teapot!)

Advertisements

Lobster armed woman alert

Posted in HOME with tags , , on June 28, 2009 by echostains

Loster is THE new colour for Summer

Loster is THE new colour for Summer

It’s that time again, so this will be a quick one.  I went out yesterday and sat in the sun, foolishly with no sun factor on…. and ended up with two bright red forearms!  How daft am I?  I wouldn’t mind, but I’m always careful to put protection on.  I wore factor 50 when I went to Vegas…and came back snow white lol!  It wouldn’t be too bad if I tanned properly and went brown…but I don’t, just turn red, so may as well not bother.  I now look like I have a pair of red rubber gloves on……….

Happy Birthday Dear Rubens!

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS with tags , , on June 27, 2009 by echostains

Leda and the Swan Rubens

Leda and the Swan Rubens

Today is the birthday of Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens (b. 1577 – 1640).  The style he is known for is Baroque.  He painted mostly religious subjects for commission, also historical subjects.

rubens celebrates the flesh

rubens celebrates the flesh

Rubens is famous for his altar pieces and his love of painting large women.  His celebration of the fuller figured woman  became known as rubenesques

rubens- the judgement-paris

rubens- the judgement-paris

Read more about him here

Here is a list of links to post I have made so far concerning artist’s birthday.  I have tried to make it a rule that I actually LIKE the artists’ work!   Some artists I do like, I have not included so far, as their birthdays have clashed with something else I was writing about. Some birthdays I have only found out about when it was too late to include them , I mean to rectify this at a later date.

Gauguin

Dali

Leonardo da Vinci

Hart Benton

Turner

Van Gogh

Morris

Pollock

Chagall

Kahlo

Modigliani

Degas

Hopper

Duchamp

The Triple the Echo, the Double the Pleasure

Posted in LIVING IN THE PAST: NOSTALGIA, period drama, WATCHED with tags , , , , , , , on June 26, 2009 by echostains

Now usually, there’s absolutely nothing worth watching on the TV, but then just like the proverbial buses – TWO turn up at the same time lol!  That’s not strictly true: I got to watch both films completely, they didn’t overlap.  The films I am taking about though are pretty old films and I have seen them before, but that didn’t stop me enjoying them all over again.

Triple Echo...wait for the ricochet

Triple Echo...wait for the ricochet

Triple Echo was made in 1972 and stars Oliver Reed (yes HIM again) Glenda Jackson and Brian Deacon.  Directed by  Micheal Apted, the film is based on a H. E. Bates novel.  Basically, the plot, set in World War II revolves around Jackson who plays a farmer’s wife whose husband is a POW. She encounters young soldier Deacon and they become lovers.  After his leave is up, Deacon decides he doesn’t want to go back to the army.  Jackson hatches a plan to pass Deacon off as her sister.  So she dresses him up, applies make up and ties his long hair in a headscarf and no one thinks anything about seeing him/her helping out on the remote farm as he looks like a land girl.

Triple Echo..wait for the ricochet

Triple Echo..wait for the ricochet

Deacon though soon gets fed up with the claustrophobic atmosphere of the place and the emasculating way that Jackson is now treating him, so the arrival of army sargeant Oliver Reed is greeted with anxiety for Jackson and excitement for Deacon. 

 Macho Reed is very much attracted to Deacon (or ‘Cath’ as Deacon now prefers to be called…..) and  is determined to have his way with her, finding her ‘shyness’ and quietness quite a challenge.

Despite Jackson’s over protectiveness (or perhaps because of it), Reed takes ‘Cath’ to a New Year dance at the army base, where ‘Cath’ soon realises that there will be no brushing off the persistent Reed.  Inevitably, Deacon is found out by Reed in an excruciating  way: chaos and tragedy ensue.  This is not a ‘feelgood’ film: there are a lot of undercurrents which are very strange: lots of contradictions and contrasts which work very well.  I’ve seen this film a few times now and it still fascinates me.

Midnight Cowboy, the odd couple

Midnight Cowboy, the odd couple

The other film ‘Midnight Cowboy’ is perhaps a more well known film.  It stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman (1969).  Voight (Joe) leaves his small town in Texas to make it big as a kept man and gigolo in New York.  Instead he becomes prey to every opportunist, including Rizzo (or ‘Ratzo’ as he becomes known), who swindles him out of the last of his money. 

MidnightCowboy, only one of them made it

MidnightCowboy, only one of them made it

 Crippled Ratzo and cowboy Joe become a double act, without much success in the cash stakes.  They become dependant on each other and after spending the winter in an abandoned building, decide to go to Florida into the sun and hopefully, a better way of life.  We never get to find out if Joe makes it big, I suspect not though.  Poor Ratzo doesn’t make it, dieing on the coach: the Florida sun shining on his face.  It is a sad and poignant film, and in places quite touching.  The flashbacks are a bit disturbing.  This film was the only X rated film to win a Best Picture Oscar, and no wonder!  Voigt and Hoffman are outstanding.

My review of the Oliver Reed book ‘Evil Spirits’

Mad about Teapots? Mad is good!

Posted in ART, DESIGN, TEAPOTS - A HOMAGE TO UNUSUAL TEAPOTS with tags , , on June 25, 2009 by echostains
His-or-Hers tea pot by steve benezue

His-or-Hers tea pot by steve benezue

 

Just look at this mad teapot from ceramicist Steve Benezue!  No I’m not being rude! that’s what the artist calls them – mad!  I just LOVE the way that these have just evolved!!!  There’s more here

if you want to know the time - ask a teapot

 

if you want to know the time - ask a teapot

Hello hello hello?  What’s all this then?  That’s never a teapot is it?  You’re talking out of your hat surely? for more eccentric teapots here’s the link

Art I LOVE: Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, – A Bygone way of Life

Posted in ART, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , , , on June 24, 2009 by echostains

a whitby street

a whitby street

I have always  loved these sepia photographs by Victorian Frank Meadow Sutcliffe (b. 1853 – 1941).  I have several  framed prints.  Although posed, there is a certain lack of self consciousness in a lot of these photographs.   It did help that Sutcliffe actually knew these villagers.  The fisher people are  my favorite portraits.  The character of these people shine  through their faces.  Theirs wasn’t an easy life, battling against the elements in order to live.  They were hardy people though with loads of grit, as evidenced in their portraits.

 

Henry Freeman Lifesboat man and hero

Henry Freeman Lifesboat man and hero

Although born in Leeds Yorkshire, Sutcliffe seems to have been fascinated by Whitby and it’s people, capturing  lots of its rural life  and some of the surrounding villages on his camera. Sutcliffe  had his studio in Whitby and lived just outside.

halcyon days

halcyon days

Sutcliffe chronicles a life that has all but disappeared.  From capturing  everyday working life to even the leisurely way people and animals moved down the lane.  At work and at play, you get the feeling that these people communicated  and cared for one another.  There is a sense of community which I find quite charming.

A reassuring sense of community

A reassuring sense of community

  Read all about this interesting photographer here

whitby  harbour

whitby harbour

The Sutcliffe Gallery UK  is a rich source of Sutcliffe’s photographs.  You can buy postcards and even framed prints here

The Sutcliffe Gallery Australia, lots of additional information on individual photos here

There’s Nothing Romantic about Romanticism, or is there? Conclusion Goya’s ‘The 3rd of May 1808’

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY with tags , , , , , on June 23, 2009 by echostains

Part one

two

three

Conclusion

‘3rd of May 1808 ‘ by Francisco de Goya

The key belief of Romanticism was the value of individual experience and individualism.  What characterised the Romantic period was the heroic view of the human struggle.  Romanticism brought to the forefront the human struggle against the violent forces of nature.  The major difference between neo-Classicism and Romanticism is the fulfilment of the hearts desire, whilst Classicism puts faith in intellect.  Romanticism then, is a way of feeling, it gives way to full expression, whereas Classicism is a way of thought.

Aesthetically and historically, Goya’s painting, ‘The 3rd of May’ is the reverse of David’s ‘Oath of the Horatii’.  The latter sets up the hero, who is willing to die for the cause.

Oath_of_the_Horatii Jaques Louis David

Oath_of_the_Horatii Jaques Louis David

Goya gives us the anti hero: the victim whose death becomes almost by chance a rallying point for those struggling against oppression.  Goya’s style has few clear outlines and his soldiers echo the reverse of David’s.

The_Shootings_of_May_3_1808

The_Shootings_of_May_3_1808

The central figure raises his hands in surrender: the pose is that of crucifixion: a sacrifice.  The corpse lying in the foreground in a pool of blood, echoes the gesture of the central victim.  The artist has effected an ‘overkill’ by shortening the distance between the bayoneted guns and the victim.  The source of light comes from the lantern, which radiates light onto the white shirt of the victim, whilst emphasising the whites of the eyes in the terrified faces of the onlookers.

Taken from an original essay by Lynda Roberts and subject to copyright (Bibliography and notes not supplied online)