Archive for March, 2011

Discovered and Uncovered Dani Dodge

Posted in ART, ART DISCOVERED AND UNCOVERED with tags , , , on March 29, 2011 by echostains

Tell It Slant

 Art is an accident waiting to happen – well it is in my case, as I hope to get back to actually doing some art very soon!  But, talking of accidents, I accidentally came across this artist whilst looking for something else (I love these sort of accidents).  American artist Dani Dodge (great name) only started painting in 2004, she had worked as a reporter for 20 years and was with the First Marine Expeditionary Unit in Iraq.  She won a  Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2006, where she was part of a team.  She may have  left journalism in 2008 but her storytelling carries on in art form.

Anyone who knows anything about me, my art and what I like will be able to see why I like this very mixed media type of art!  Dodge works with an eclectic mix of  media, multi layering acrylic paint, collage, ink, paper etc on to canvas.  The results are revelations of the very human condition.

Down time

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I would describe her work as Abstract narrative expressionism.  Every picture does indeed tell  a story in these colourful and meaningful pieces.  The artist explains her urge to work in this way in her statement;-

The drive to tell stories of humanity runs deep within me. I worked many years as a journalist and fulfilled that need with words. After covering the war in Iraq, it became clear to me that words were not enough – I needed something more expressive and powerful.

I discovered painting, which has consumed me ever since. Now I layer different materials to tell tales of loneliness, joy, pain and triumph – in short, of being human. I venture beyond objects and objectivity in search of the elusive truth of our individual and collective soul as I paint outside the lines.

Passion for Playing

The artist does painting demonstrations and teaches workshops.  She also has her own arts blog an arts blog for Voice of San Diego. where she write about the artists she meets.  Multi layered, painterly, expressive and original. 

I like – very much 🙂

Images from Dani Dodge website with thanks!
Read her blog here

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The Art of Childhood

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART VIDEOS with tags , , on March 22, 2011 by echostains

Childhood has featured a lot in art and many artists have captured those bygone days where the sun always shone and the school summer holidays seemed to stretch out forever.  How wonderful it must have been for the sitters of these paintings to look backwards at themselves forever young  – and how lovely it is for us the viewer to sit back and enjoy the legacies of these artists!

  Many artists work  are featured in this video, see how many you can recognise.  To start you off, here are the first few.  To see the rest please look under the video on Youtube at ‘show’ to reveal the rest.  You may be surprised 🙂

Paintings:
1.mary cassatt- little girl in a blue armchair
2.mary cassatt- the sisters
3.james jacques joseph tissot- a little nimrod
4.stephen gjertson- admiration
5.thomas gainsborough- the painter’s daughters with a cat
6.thomas eakins- baby at play
7.william michael harnett- attention company
8.sir joshua reynolds- the brown boy
9.sir thomas lawrence- the calmady children
10.mary cassatt- child in a straw hat
11. ” – children playing on the beach
12. ” – francoise in a square backed chair read (aka young girl reading, young girl in a blue dress)
13.mary cassatt- sarah in a green bonnet
14.sir thomas lawrence- children sir john julian

Video by ilkea – thanks!

Music: Albinoni-Adagio from Oboe Concerto in D minor Op.9 No.2

Discovered and Uncovered Heidi Keyes

Posted in ART, ART DISCOVERED AND UNCOVERED with tags , , on March 12, 2011 by echostains

Bills First Wife

WordPress blog     Art of the Day   can always be relied upon to feature interesting art.  It also has it’s own Facebook page, which is where  I first saw this artist.  Once seen, I just had to take a further look!  Heidi Keyes is an artist who spends her time either painting or flying (she is also a flight attendant).  She divides her time  between Milwaukie, Denver when grounded, and the rest of her time is spent flying around the world.

Her wild contour paintings are full of colour energy and life –  her technique   a combination of intuition and emphasis.  Though the artist does paint realistically occasionally, she  prefers to experiment with exaggerated line.  The artist’s way of working is explained below;-

“I depict various stages and situations of the human figure in my work. These images are selected to express the incompleteness of humanity, a continuous search for truer answers. I look to the moment when one finds oneself on the precipice of a life-altering decision, reluctant to continue, but too far gone to turn back– the past and the future expressed in a single brushstoke of delicious uncertainty. I use washes to achieve this effect of impermanence, and allow them to drip freely down the canvas, embracing spontaneity in my work, as in my life.” 

Rainy Day Girl

The paintings are quite arresting and there is a sense of immediacy –  that they are of the moment.  Energy and life  spring out of these loose spontaneous paintings.  They are startlingly honest and refreshingly unrestrictive.

“The way I look at painting is the way I view my life– nothing is ever certain, and often the best results come from mistakes.”

The artist started experimenting with her technique because she became frustrated with the excruciating detail of art and she found  that her pursuit for perfection was actually impeding her artistic expression.  Her love of blind contour drawing lead her to experiment with the brush – and her art became ‘freed’!

I was pleased and surprised at the level of sophistication achieved through the use of simplistic lines and connected forms. The figures I created were uncertain, unsure, and often pensive, but my lines were confident and bold.

Crossing the Liberty Bridge Budapest Hungary

 Not only does the artist paint figuratively, she has also produced a series called ‘Fly’ which consists of paintings she has done in hotel rooms around the world.  I particularly like her use of colour in these paintings, my favorite being The Liberty Bridge Budapest Hungary from this series.

Heidi Keyes website can be found here and is well worth the visit 🙂

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Exhibition: David Hancock ‘Time to Pretend’

Posted in ART, exhibitions with tags , , , , , , on March 5, 2011 by echostains

Mikey as link, Pencil crayons on paper

David Hancock explores the space between physicality and psychological space using a  hyper-realist technique.  His exhibition Time to Pretend (The Hub, Manchester 3rd – 18th March 2011) elevates the ordinary to the  decidedly extraordinary.   Gaming and urban folklore are fused together in these intricate drawings.  This  realism was made even more extraordinary by the actual presence of his subjects (his friends) wandering round the exhibition on opening night, making their likenesses in these portaits all the more startling!

Daryl as Tifa Lockhart pencil crayon on paper

The work is escapist – yet it plays with reality –  a moment in time.  The artist  uses photographic images which he then translates into a narrative via little pixel like brushstrokes (or in this work, pencil crayon on paper).  The results are disconcerting – as the Gamers are simultaneously revealed, yet hide behind these roles, providing the viewer with flashes of revelation which are tantalising.

miriam as Lolita Pencil Crayon on paper

Hancock documents escapism in our youth subculture and whilst also referencing utopian vision.  The reality and unreality of these are what the artist plays with.  Escapism through computer gaming and role-playing meets utopia and in the Gaming portraits the individual is attached by an umbilical cord to their controller.  Hancock calls these works double portraits as in a sense he is simultaneously showing the two worlds of their personalities as they immerse their selves in their Game playing and their character roles. The work, though contemporary has its roots in Romanticism and the  utopian visions held by Ruskin, Morris and the Pre-Raphaelite.  The characters take on special powers, hints of which are shown in the portraits as they fly through time to become the hero’s of the now.  An interesting and thought-provoking exhibition by Hancock.  I shall look forward to seeing his other larger scale work.  To really appreciate these images please go to the artist website where larger versions of these works, including many others can be seen. 

David Hancock website here 

Images from  here and  here

More details of this exhibition here