Archive for the exhibitions Category

Happy Christmas and New Year!

Posted in Architecture, ART, ART DISCOVERED AND UNCOVERED, ART HISTORY, ART VIDEOS, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, BEHIND THE PAINT, CHRISTMAS, DESIGN, exhibitions, PHOTOGRAPHY, POLLS, SCULPTURE, WEIRD AND WACKY DESIGN with tags , , , , on December 24, 2011 by echostains

In my usual tradition, here is the round up of featured posts for 2011.  It’s been a pretty tubulent year personally for me and I haven’t blogged as much as I usually do – but my New Year resolution is to do so, so get ready for more eclectic mixes of art, design and quirkyness!  I wish you all a very happy Christmas and a bright New Year!

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Stone me! Bathbombs, puppets, dribbles and Little Dancers!

Posted in Architecture, ART, BYGONE ADVERTISING AND PACKAGING, DESIGN, exhibitions, LIVING IN THE PAST: NOSTALGIA, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on November 2, 2011 by echostains

Ronnie Wood Sketch

Musician,artist and printmaker  Ronnie Wood, who plays with the Rolling Stones (and has also played with The Faces, and the Jeff Beck Group) trained at Ealing Art College. His new exhibition, called ‘Time and Places’ will showcase 100 pieces of his work, including paintings of Jimi Hendrix, Slash and portraits of friends and family.  It shall run 7 – 12th November Cork Street, Mayfair. London.  Wood had this to say about his work:-

“People don’t know that I’m an artist. Playing music as part of a team effort is wonderful, but to express individuality as an artist is very personal. Art is more powerful, a more personal statement.”

 Creativity is creativity, but I take his point about personal expression and the need for own space to indulge this.  A group of artists can all bounce off each other and feed off ideas, each with their individual interpretation, – the inner journey must be solitary though.

 

 

 

Meanwhile, it’s nearly that time again.  No not Bonfire night – The Annual Turner Prize is nearly upon us.  love it or hate it, The Turner Prize has attracted controversy since it began back in 1984 to celebrate new developments in contemporary art.  Contenders have to have had outstanding exhibitions – and be under 50.

This year the exhibition will be held in the wonder BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts Gateshead.  This is a wonderful venue – a large and airy space  which used to be an old flour mill (see my review of this arts centre from when we visited – here)  The contenders for the Turner Prize this year are;-

Karla Black         

The BALTIC


Martin Boyce
Hilary Lloyd
George Shaw

I shall be reviewing the other contenders in a later post, but my attention was drawn to the strange media of artist Karla Black – obviously a person after my heart where diverse media is concerned.  Whilst I have ground soft pastels mixed with polyfiller, and have flirted with latex, recycled acrylic scraps, Black uses crushed bath bombs (must smell wonderful!) foodstuffs and even medicines to make her sculptures.  Heavily influenced by psychoanalysis, she states;-

‘While there are ideas about psychological and emotional developmental processes held within the sculptures I make, the things themselves are actual physical explorations into thinking, feeling, communicating and relating’.

There’s a good review of this artist, image from here   If you want to see some of my painterly ‘recipes’ please look in my Categories MY SURFACES.  Here’s one I did earlier ‘Brown Sauce meets Latex’

This TV built 1936 was still going in 2009 please read the link below

Age is a dichotomy in many ways,on the one hand, nothing much surprises me any more – yet on the other there is still a yearning to believe in somethings and I still feel a childlike disappointment when they turn out to be wrong.  For instance, I find it very very difficult to believe that television is 75 years old today!  It seems only yesterday when I was told to see if there was any mail, went downstairs and saw a television showing a children’s programme in black and white.  I had never seen a television before – so you can imagine….  I was watching Bill and Ben the Flowerpot Men – and they spoke my language 🙂   Bill and Ben, along with Andy Pandy, The Woodentops and many more were part of the Watch with Mother series.  BBC Watch with Mother ran from 1952 –  about 1965 when it was replaced by other children’s programmes like Camberwick Green, Pogles Wood and Trumpton.  Here’s a very early episode from Bill and Ben (Thanks to ) :-

Also in the news is the famous Little Dancer, the bronze ballerina made

The Little Dancer

by French Impressionist Edgar Degas.  The bronze sculpture, stands 40 inches in height and  wearing a silk hair ribbon and satin tutu failed to sell at Christie’s New York.  The ‘Little Dancer aged 14’  had a pre sale estimate of between $25 million to $35 million.  Degas’s heirs had 28 bronzes cast from the original which was made from tinted wax.  Whilst I find it difficult to believe that there was no buyer for such an iconic work – on the other hand, the price tag is a bit on the high side…..

Whilst the ‘Little Dancer’ is at least a bronze, Jackson Pollock’s No.5 1948 painting sold at for $140 million in a private sale in 2006.  The painting measures  8ft x 4ft and is on a sheet of fibreboard.  Quality versus quantity?  Not necessarily – take a look at the rest of the worlds most expensive paintings here.  Perhaps, in the end, a painting is only worth the price someone is willing to pay for it?

Ronnie Wood related link and painting from here

Television image and article (from 2009) is this TV still going now I wonder? read here

BBC first broadcast info here

Degas image and more information here

Pre Raphaelite Delights that last longer than 15 minutes with Lashings of Ginger Beer,

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, BOOKS! DEAR READER I READ IT, DESIGN, exhibitions, HISTORY, LIVING IN THE PAST: NOSTALGIA with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 12, 2011 by echostains

It’s been ages since I last posted (the longest yet) but I hope to make amends today by writing a longer post – a kind of round-up of posts I should have written.

Enid Blyton

The 11th August was popular children’s writer Enid Blyton’s birthday (11 August 1897 – 28 November 1968).  Here’s a  a link to another post I wrote about this author over on my Bookstains.  Eileen A Soper illustrated every one of 21   Famous Five books. 

five-have-a-wonderful-time

Eileen A Soper (b. 1905 – 1990 Hertfordshire UK)was an illustrator , print maker and a watercolourist.  She had her first exhibition at the Royal Academy in 1921 at the age of 15, making her the youngest artist ever to exhibit.  Two of her etchings were bought by Queen Mary. 

 

 

 

Her work has great nostalgic appeal and is as attractive today to adults as it was a source of delight to them when they were  children.  A gallery of this artist’s work can be found here

 

 

 

 

 

Eileen Sitting in a chair watercolour 1923

Other artists birthdays include Andy Warhol whose birthday I celebrated a while back with this post which featured one a page of my altered book  (this book is still ongoing… complete with artist research)

Andy Warhol-Self-Portrait-1986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work by Ford Madox Brown

News of an exciting exhibition is coming to Manchester City Gallery (Saturday 24 September 2011 – Sunday 29 January 2012)  A major exhibition of Pre Raphaelite artist Ford Maddox Brown will go on show.  Over 140 paintings by the artist, including his Manchester Town Hall murals (which I have seen) will be exhibited.  The work will be divided into different themes and periods of  the artist’s life including his radical change of direction artistically.  Ford Madox Brown is particularly well-known for his narrative paintings which relate to life in the Victorian age and I think that viewing the paintings collectively will  give the viewer a clearer idea of how radical the Pre Raphaelites really were.  The 12 paintings, known as The Manchester murals depict life in the city in the Victorian age – a must for any Mancunian interested in their city.  The exhibition which will also include a rediscovered painting by the artist.  The painting The Seraph’s Watch  could prove to be a crowd puller.  Here’s a tantalising detail from it below.

Eileen A Soper Gallery (images from there)

Heather’s Blyton pages (all the book images can be found here too)

Manchester City Art Gallery 

The Enid Blyton Society

Andy Warhol image and art history here

More about Ford Madox Brown (and Work image) here

Seraph’s Watch image and an interesting article about this exhibition and Victorian art in general here

Exhibition: David Hancock ‘Time to Pretend’

Posted in ART, exhibitions with tags , , , , , , on March 5, 2011 by echostains

Mikey as link, Pencil crayons on paper

David Hancock explores the space between physicality and psychological space using a  hyper-realist technique.  His exhibition Time to Pretend (The Hub, Manchester 3rd – 18th March 2011) elevates the ordinary to the  decidedly extraordinary.   Gaming and urban folklore are fused together in these intricate drawings.  This  realism was made even more extraordinary by the actual presence of his subjects (his friends) wandering round the exhibition on opening night, making their likenesses in these portaits all the more startling!

Daryl as Tifa Lockhart pencil crayon on paper

The work is escapist – yet it plays with reality –  a moment in time.  The artist  uses photographic images which he then translates into a narrative via little pixel like brushstrokes (or in this work, pencil crayon on paper).  The results are disconcerting – as the Gamers are simultaneously revealed, yet hide behind these roles, providing the viewer with flashes of revelation which are tantalising.

miriam as Lolita Pencil Crayon on paper

Hancock documents escapism in our youth subculture and whilst also referencing utopian vision.  The reality and unreality of these are what the artist plays with.  Escapism through computer gaming and role-playing meets utopia and in the Gaming portraits the individual is attached by an umbilical cord to their controller.  Hancock calls these works double portraits as in a sense he is simultaneously showing the two worlds of their personalities as they immerse their selves in their Game playing and their character roles. The work, though contemporary has its roots in Romanticism and the  utopian visions held by Ruskin, Morris and the Pre-Raphaelite.  The characters take on special powers, hints of which are shown in the portraits as they fly through time to become the hero’s of the now.  An interesting and thought-provoking exhibition by Hancock.  I shall look forward to seeing his other larger scale work.  To really appreciate these images please go to the artist website where larger versions of these works, including many others can be seen. 

David Hancock website here 

Images from  here and  here

More details of this exhibition here

A Room (or two) with quite a view (or two)

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART VIDEOS, exhibitions with tags , , , , , on February 1, 2011 by echostains

Google has just launched their new Google Art project today (link at the bottom of post) and it’s rather exciting!  Now you can visit 17 famous art galleries around the world – without leaving your home!  Using the same technology as Google Street Maps you can ‘walk’ round the rooms of the buildings and zoom into the paintings!

Chris Ofili No woman no cry

The images are high-resolution and you can really see details AND the brushstrokes!  I’m very excited by this and have already had a peek in the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam and  Tate Britain where I zoomed into Chris Ofili’s ‘No woman No Cry’  among many.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Blake ‘Ghost of a Flea’

William Blake’s ‘Ghost of a Flea’ proved very interesting. Although I really like this idea, I do hope that this project will act as an aperitif and inspire people to actually visit these galleries;-

The National Gallery London
The Frick Collection New York City
Freer Gallery of Art. Smithsonian Washington DC
State Tretakov Gallery Moscow
Alte Nationalgalerie Berlin
The State Hermitage Museum St Petersburg
Palace of Versailles Versailles
MoMA, The Museum of Modern Art New York City
Rijksmuseum Amersterdam
Museo Reina Sofia Madrid
Mueo Thyssen Bornemisza Madrid
The Metropolitan Museum of Art New York City
Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam
Museum Kampa Prague
Uffizi Gallery Florence
Tate Britain London
Germaldegalerie Berlin

In the far right of the screen there is a small plus sign near each painting – this will bring you really up close to the painting 🙂  Sometime this crashes, but don’t forget –  the project is brand new and millions of people will be virtually stampeding through these galleries (just had a quick look at Edouard Manet’s In the Conservatory in the Alte Nationalgalerie Berlin myself, though I’m not too sure how I ended up there. I’m going to take my time visiting  these galleries  – which will take ages.  These are treasure houses full of art and do need to be savoured.

http://www.googleartproject.com/

Video by http://www.youtube.com/user/GoogleArtProject with thanks!

Chris Ofili image from here and Blake image here

Scottish artists – A celebration

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART VIDEOS, exhibitions with tags , , , on January 25, 2011 by echostains

To commemorate Burns Night, the greatest Scottish poet (tonight) I have compiled a special video of Scottish artists and artists associated with the National Galleries of Scotland.  Favorites of mine include Allan Ramsay, Anya Gallaccio,Duncan Grant George Leslie Hunter, Glenn Onwin, RB Kitaj,Joseph Crawhall, Norman Edgar, Oskar Kokoschka and Robert Burns! Which are yours?

To further the Scottish theme, there is a post about Robert Burns and a poetry competition over on Bookstains.  Don’t worry the entries don’t have to be written in the Scottish language but that would be GREAT also 🙂

Just click on Rabbie to enter

PLUS 26th January Happy Birthday to Jackson Pollock  earlier post for those who missed it here

Hats Off to York!

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, exhibitions with tags , , , , on November 20, 2010 by echostains

collapsable Opera hat

We’ve recently come back from a few days away in York.  Whilst there, I popped into the city Art Gallery where along with the ceramics, illustrations (wonderful small collection from children’s books) and paintings, there was an exhibition simply called ‘Hats’.  The exhibition which runs from to 18th September 2010 – 23rd  January 2011 tracks the way that hats have been used in social etiquette and trends during the last 400 years.

Jennifer Alexander, assistant curator of fine art, said:

“We have a wonderful collection of paintings from the last 400 years and many show how styles and fashions have changed. From baker hats to bonnets to bowlers, all hats say something about the person wearing it, whether it is their job, their social class or their era.

The hats are delightful and some of the fabrics still in very good condition, the intricate decorations including a dead birds head are fascinating.  But what struck me the most is the size of the hats.  Why are our heads bigger now? The skulls seem tiny compared to our present day ones.  I love hats and have been known to wear a few in my time – after all they can add a good few inches to the shorter person which I think is always a good thing where I’m concerned:-)

Barbara Hepworth Surgeon Waiting

Around the walls of the exhibition are paintings of the hats in their context.  Barbara Hepworth‘s oil and graphite on gesso prepared paper was an unexpected find. 

Miss Mary Arabella Jay exhibited 1819 by William Etty

 York painter William Etty (1787-1849) The Missionary Boy was also on display, unfortunately I couldn’t find an image of it to display here.  Etty was one of the few artists to become successful at large history paintings.  He liked to paint nudes, portraits and later, landscapes.  here’s an example of his work.

English artist Spencer Gore (1878- 1914) was a Founder member of the Fitzroy Street group and was involved with the formation of the Camden Town Group.   He came into contact with Pissarro whose impressionistic style he adapted.  Walter Sickert was another great friend and influence upon his art.  Spencer Gore is an interesting artist in his own right and I shall be writing more about him soon.

Spencer Gore. Balcony at the Alhambra, c. 1911-1912. Oil on canvas

Along with Roger Bissiere‘s Woman in a Straw Hat, other paintings include French artist Jacques Emile Blanche  (1861-1942) whose painting ‘Knightsbridge to Sloane Square’ painted in 1908/9 shows everyone from children to Policeman behatted.  Only the beggars remain bare-headed.

Hepworth image here, Etty image from here Gore image from here and info and more images here

More about York Gallery and the exhibitions here