Archive for June, 2009

There’s nothing Romantic about Romanticism or is there? part three

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 22, 2009 by echostains

Continuing from part one

part two

The English Landscape painter John Constable (1776 – 1837) also had a hard time with regards to his art being taken seriously.  He tried to gain respectability for Landscape painting,  trying to get it accepted as a proper subject matter.

Flatford Mill by John Constable

Flatford Mill by John Constable

 

“I should paint my own places best –  painting is but another word for feeling.”  John Constable

He believed that ‘God Almighty’s sunlight’ was as full of moral and spiritual values as a scene from ancient history.  He was about fifty years ahead of his time.  Although rejected in England, he was much admired in France.

Goya_witches sabbath, the great goat

Goya_witches sabbath, the great goat

The Spanish painter Francisco Goya (1746 – 1848), subordinated reason for feeling.  He was the first painter of the absurd.  His foremost influence was Velazquez.  In his painting ‘The Sabbath’ or ‘The Great Goat’, he showscross dressing men  engaging in a witches sabbath.  This was part of a group of paintings that came to be known as the ‘Black paintings’, paintings showing dark and horrific scenes of the degeneration of man,: a subject Goya was fascinated with.

detail from 'The Great Goat'

detail from 'The Great Goat'

William Blake (b. 1757 – 1827) was both a poet and an artist that strove for social and political freedom for all.  He used the visionary approach.  His work ranges form the religious ‘Ancient of Days’, that harks back to medieval beliefs of God as an architect,  –

William Blake 'The Ancient of Days'

William Blake 'The Ancient of Days'

– to the rather grotesque ‘Ghost of a Flea’, which owes something to Goya.

ghost of a flea by William Blake

ghost of a flea by William Blake

Henry Fuseli (b. Germany 1741 – 1825) taught John Constable, but later ridiculed him.  He infused classical structure with completely irrational thought.  His painting ‘Nightmare’ contains the stuff which bad dreams are made of…and is also a precursor to Surrealism.

fuseli-nightmare

fuseli-nightmare

Here’s an annotated view of this painting, explainting the various imagery Fuseli used. here

Lots of Goya’s work and information can be found here

Concluding tomorrow…

 

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There’s Nothing Romantic about Romanticism…or is there? part 2

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY with tags , , , , , on June 21, 2009 by echostains

Continuing from part one

In Delacroix’s ‘Liberty Leading the People‘ 1830, we see an emotional approach.  One of the main differences between Classicism and Romanticism is that Romanticism shows a way of feeling and Classicism is a way of thought.

Liberty leading the people delacroix

Liberty leading the people delacroix

This painting is was used as part of a propaganda campaign regarding the Revolution.  I think that it is in some ways similiar to Jacques Louis David’s ‘Oath of the Horatii’, as it calls the country’s people to arms.  But the main difference between the way that the artist’s do this lies in David’s use of patriotism, duty and allegiance and the more emotional cry of hope and freedom from Delacroix: the possibility of overcoming injustice.

Oath_of_the_Horatii Jaques Louis David

 

 

 

Oath_of_the_Horatii Jaques Louis David

By the use of emotional messages in his paintings, Delacroix manages to unify the peasants with hope and stirs within them, the longing for freedom.

The-Sheepfold,-Moonlight,-1856-60 Millet

The-Sheepfold,-Moonlight,-1856-60 Millet

Jean Francois Millet, son of a peasant farmer (1814 – 1875) painted rustic scenes, endowing with majesty the often overlooked aspects of nature.  He never achieved popularity in his own lifetime.  He had a revulsion for frivolity and ‘told it like it was’.  Unfortunately for him, the public preferred the artiface of nature, not the nitty gritty: the wheelbarrows, peasants tending their flocks or field workers.  Millet’s emotional response seems to have come from his environment.  The abandoned plough in ‘Sheep Fold’ indicates the frustration that man feels when the seasons conspire against him, and also symbolises the life and death cycle that we are all part of.

Continued tomorrow

Millet galllery

 

 

There’s nothing Romantic about Romanticism or is there?

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY with tags , , , on June 20, 2009 by echostains

What is Romanticism?  Romanticism was a movement in the arts that flourished in the late 18th century to the mid 19th century and rebelled against Neo Classicism.  It was the first movement to involve all of Europe in art, architecture, literature and music.

The Barque of Dante by Delacroix

The Barque of Dante by Delacroix

Eugene Delacroix (1798 1863) sometimes incorporated a tiger in some of his paintings to depict energy, will, mood and wildness.  Delacroix was a born illustrator, combining animated gesture with graphic skill.  He painted in the tradition of Theodore Gericault (1791 – 1824), whose painting ‘The Raft of the Medusa’depicts an actual event that happened in the summer of 1816.  Gericault writes

‘Neither poetry or painting can ever do justice to the anguish and horror to the men on the raft.’

Gericault was right about this as the painting shows a group of well muscled robust men displaying dramatic gestures: gestures that the real victims would not have had the strength to make.  Gericault uses this opportunity to make a political statement about the State.  The captain of the frigate, being a nobleman escaped in one of the few lifeboats – leaving the poor crew (149 men and one woman) to built a makeshift raft.  The painting which incorporates a ‘pyramid of hope’. The triangles within the picture symbolises the progression from the depth of despair to a apex of hope (the man sighting a rescue ship) at the top of the picture.

gericault-raft_of_the_medusa

gericault-raft_of_the_medusa

But there’s a lot more to Romanticism than meets the eye……

To be continued tomorrow

The true story about the raft of the Medusa is here

There’s a smashing piece of informative writing on this blog

Back in the Picture

Posted in ART, BRONTE BITES, DESIGN, PAST PLACES, YORK BREAK with tags , , on June 19, 2009 by echostains

At last!  We got a new camera!  The other one broke and couldn’t be fixed.  I have missed not having a camera a lot.  I saw lots of interesting sight today in Manchester.  My mobile just does not do it at all……

haworth church stained glass

 

haworth church stained glass

I also like to keep track of my depleting face, which seems to be altering shape by the day..and not in a good way I may add!  I can’t wait to get snapping away!  Here’s one I did earlier with the last life of the old camera –

inside the apothecary haworth

inside the apothecary haworth

Strange Brew?

Posted in ART, DESIGN, TEAPOTS - A HOMAGE TO UNUSUAL TEAPOTS with tags , on June 18, 2009 by echostains

These pots really appealed to me!  I just like everything about them: the quirkiness, the design, the glaze and the playfulness!  They are by Mark Heimann.  There is some lovely and unusual ceramics on his site!

http://www.lostmtnclay.com/wild/viking_teapots/

viking-teapots-dk-01-s mark heinmann

viking-teapots-dk-01-s mark heinmann

Testing testing testing

Posted in OUT AND ABOUT MANCHESTER with tags , , on June 17, 2009 by echostains

It’s been a lovely day, so tonight  I’m off to the quiz night at the pub!  So…….

bbc-1997 and I remember all the others too...

bbc-1997 and I remember all the others too...

Art I LOVE: Frank Gehry ‘Fred and Ginger building’ Prague, Czech Republic

Posted in ART, DESIGN, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , on June 16, 2009 by echostains

gehry3 nationale-nedderlanden prague

 

gehry3 nationale-nedderlanden prague

The Nationale Nederlanden or The Dancing building or Fred and Ginger or the Rasin are all names for one of my favorite buildings: the architect is Frank Gehry b. Poland 1929.  The building is in Prague, and I was lucky enough to see it (albeit only from a distance).

dancing windows nationale Nederlanden building

 

dancing windows nationale Nederlanden building

The building has been likened to the movements of  a pair of dancers (Fred Astaire and Ginger Rodgers).  Indeed, the building does have a kind of playful  movement to it: the windows, placed at different levels, seem to bounce!

More on Gehry later….

Read about the building here