Archive for the FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE Category

Art I LOVE – Pierre Bonnard

Posted in ART, ART VIDEOS, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , , , on May 2, 2011 by echostains

French artist and printmaker  Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947) was  one of the founding members of Les Nabis.  Les Nabis were a group of avant-garde Post Impressionists who distorted colour and composition to  decorative effect.  Bonnard was interested in unusual and unexpected angles and aerial perspectives – greatly influenced by Japanese prints. It is this which links him with Vuillard and the Nabis.  His interest in capturing the light is very impressionistic but his expressive use of paint  and his intense close brushwork give his work expression.  His wife Marthe features heavily in his work, often seen in the bath or eating a meal.  Bonnard didn’t paint from life but preferred to draw his subjects first, sometimes photographing them. He always made notes of the colours.  He would then translate these colours onto canvas from his notes.

Video by  with thanks!

Read more about the Nabis here

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Art I LOVE Maggi Hambling

Posted in ART, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , , , , on January 29, 2011 by echostains

I’ve always loved the art of Maggie Hambling.  I’m a big fan of painterly, expressionistic art – words which aptly describe this artists work. 

Maggie Hambling

Hambling studied East Anglian School of Painting and Drawing from 1960, under the tutelage of Cedric Morris and then at the Ipswich school of Art (1962 – 64).  She then went to Camberwell  (1964 -1967) graduating at the Slade School of Art in 1969.

Max Wall by Maggi Hambling

Though known mainly for her portraiture – a lot  were in the National Gallery where she became the first artist in residence in 1980 and did a series of portraits of the comedienne Max Wall.   

She  has also created sculpture including : Memorial to Oscar Wilde London and Scallop,  an interlocking steel sculpture on Alderburgh beach, dedicated to the composer Benjamin Britten  The sculpture itself was made by a local foundry and copied from a 4 inch model supplied by the artist.   The sculpture has created a lot of controversy – some say it enhances the view of the sea, others say it blocks the sea out.  The sculpture has been vandalised a few times too.  Hambling herself calls it a conversation piece – a conversation with the sea;-

“An important part of my concept is that at the centre of the sculpture, where the sound of the waves and the winds are focused, a visitor may sit and contemplate the mysterious power of the sea,”

 

 

      

  

The Scallop by Maggi Hambling

 

Hambling’s subjects include a lot of Gay people including George Melly, Stephen Fry and Quentin Crisp. 

George Melly drawing

 

From the 1980s Hambling turned mainly to landscapes and recently seascapes.  Her work has become  a lot more abstract and in 1995 she received an OBE for her services to painting and appointed a CBE in the new years Honours list in 2010.

George Hambling

 Quote from here

Information about the artist – start here

Wonderful interview which really reveals the personality of the artist here  What a character 🙂

Ghost of George Singing

Max Wall image from here  Scallop image here  Melly drawing from here George Always here, Ghost of George singing here, Archie MacDonald here  Francis Bacon image from here  Hambling photo here

Francis Bacon by Hambling

Hambling’s website  http://www.maggihambling.com/

The short video shows extracts of her work in her studio. Video by shabboleth Thanks!

Archie MacDonald 1981 Hambling

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Ghosts of 2010

Posted in ALICE IN WONDERLAND, ART, ART DISCOVERED AND UNCOVERED, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, BODIES IN PRESERVATION, CRITIQUE CORNER, DESIGN, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE, Lancaster, OUT AND ABOUT MANCHESTER, POEM CHALLENGES, YORK BREAK with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 2, 2011 by echostains

Although I have cut down on my  posts from one per day to one every 4 or 5 days in 2010 starting in August, I managed 256 posts.  I hope to improve on this year and continue to build up Bookstains, which is proving popular. This year Echostains celebrated 16 artists birthdays (another area I intend to improve on).  Some earlier categories have gone and I have plans for some new ones.  This year saw the arrival of slide shows and polls.  WordPress is a learning process and I’m still learning:-)

PS This video was completed in 2010 and was supposed to go on New Years day.    I have had to revise it because it was originally over 20 minutes long 😀

Art I LOVE -Egon Schiele

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , on August 24, 2010 by echostains

Seated woman with bent knee

Austrian expressionist artist Egon Schiele b.1890 Tuln Austria was the first artist I researched when I was at University.  Doing lots of Life drawing and looking round to see which sort of art influenced me his work soon caught my eye.  Like many art students I bought the series of Taschen art books that were and still are  available.  I still have these books, they are excellent resources – and I have nearly all of them!  The books are so informative, the illustrations so clear and colourful, and very reasonably priced.

The Scornful Woman

I have meant to write about this artist for quite a while.  One of his paintings, stolen by the Nazis and in the centre of a 12 year dispute was reported in this article today.  It makes interesting reading.

As a child Schiele was not academically inclined but his uncle, who became his guardian recognised his talent for art and sent him to the Vienna Academy of Fine arts when he was 16.  He became a good friend of Gustave Klimt whose work influenced and inspired him.  Schiele explored sexuality through the human form, using expressionistic body shapes in twisting and contorted positions.

standing male nude with red loincloth

When Shciele moved to Neulengbach he was arrested and jailed briefly for seducing an underage girl.  The artist seems to have courted controversy throughout his life style through his art his lifestyle and his choice of young models.  He did serve in World War 1 and was well respected as an artist, though he never saw any fighting.  He continued his career after the war and exhibited  50 works for the 49th Secession exhibition in Vienna 1917.  He died of the Spanish epidemic in 1918, he was only 28 years old.  I often wonder what sort of art he would have produced if he had lived longer.  He was a prolific worker and has left us a legacy of his fine work.

All images from the Egon Shiele excellent website  Here

Mini biography of this artist here

Art I LOVE – Arthur Rackham

Posted in ALICE IN WONDERLAND, ART, ART HISTORY, DESIGN, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , on June 23, 2010 by echostains

The Three Bears

I was first captivated by the illustrations of Arthur Rackham by reading the Ingoldsby Legends.  As children we weren’t really allowed to read this book because of the dark subject matter (mostly horror poems and stories).   Some of the illustrations were enough to induce nightmares – but all that made it all the more exciting!

Hey up the chimney Lass...Ingoldsby Legends

London born Rackham  (1867 – 1939) illustrated  a great many journals and books.  His style is easily recognised, because he uses muted water colours, his style is imaginative and whimsical and there are always tiny details in the picture which gradually reveal themselves to the viewer, making the work even more enjoyable.

Norns weaving destiny by Rackham for Seigfried's The ring

Rackham crops up everywhere.  I even came across his illustrations when I was researching the story of ‘The Ring’ by Wagner.  He was a prolific illustrator.  His Victorian style was in keeping with his imaginative readers, full of fun yet exciting too.  He illustrated poems too –   Goblin Market by Christina Rosetti among many.  Rip Van Winkle, Peter Pan – even Alice in Wonderland. When I look back at his illustrations, he recaptures my childhood and fills it with  carefree days of hiding away with  books (forbidden and allowed)  and transports me back to a magical land where the sun always shone and the corners were filled with the darkest shadows.   What a wonderful contribution to childhood!

Hey up the Chimney Lass image from here 

The Three Bears the illustration for English fairytales by Flora Annie Steel here

Wonderful images and info here

Rackham gallery here

Art I LOVE: Michael Landy

Posted in ART, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , on June 19, 2010 by echostains

 

Michael Landy breakdown

I have always had a  soft spot for the artist Michael Landy (b. uk 1963)  ever since I saw his ‘Breakdown’ l which was a sort of living installation.  This is the famous piece he did when he systematically got rid of all his possessions bit by it, breaking them down into tiny bits and disposing of them.   Even art work by his famous artist friends, like Damian Hirst, Tracy Emin went into the shredder – everything went.  His credit cards went, his car, everything he possessed, all went the same way.

Landy is one of the original YBA (Young British Artists) to emerge from Goldsmiths College in 1988 and featured in the famous Freeze exhibition.  Breakdown 2001 consisted of Landy taking over and old C and A store in Oxford Street London and turned into a kind of deconstruction factory.

possessions

He took all his possessions including art work, catalogued all the 7,227 items then along with his workers set about destroying everything.  he reduced everything to its basic components and shredded it in public.

Landy attracted a lot of visitors who watched this.  he received no money for it and was left with just bags of rubbish, which he didn’t make any money from and was left for a while afterwards without even a credit a credit card.

His latest project is called Art Bin and the artist calls it a ‘monument to creative  failure.‘  Artists and collectors are encouraged to dump their art in a huge bin….  In case you’ve not guessed, Landy’s  work is about consumerism and waste.  there’s a good article about Breakdown here

Find out why he did it and what the consequences where by watching this short video

Images from here

Video from illuminationstv

Art I LOVE – Jack Butler Yeats

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, FAVORITE ART: Art I LOVE with tags , , , , , on May 27, 2010 by echostains

Jack Butler Yeats

Jack  (John) Butler Yeats (b. 1871 – 1957  (London) was the brother of the Irish poet William Butler Yeats whose poem ‘He wishes for the cloths of Heaven’ I featured the other day.  Yeats started out as an illustrator usually depicting scenes of Ireland.   His style had elements of Romanticism but in 1920 his style became more Expressionistic.

jack butler-yeats Head of a man self portrait

Yeats was educated in Sligo Ireland but studied art at the Westminster school of Art under Frederick  Brown.  He worked in watercolour until 1905 when he started using oils on a regularly.   Sir Hugh Percy Lane who founded the Hugh Lane Art Gallery, Dublin commissioned Yeats to paint Distinguished Irish men.  He was very much influenced by the French Impressionists Masters in Lane’s collection.

jb yeats o connel bridge

Though not involved politically in the Irish republic movement, he began to paint urban and rural Irish life in a range of more varied colours and swapped the brush at times for other mark making tools.  His brushstrokes became swirling and free depicting vigour and freedom of expression.

Jack B Yeats The Singing Horseman

1920 was a turning point for Yeats, he turned  from illustration to symbolism in a much more Expressionistic style.   Yeats believed that the painter  must be part of the land and of the life he paints and this can be seen by his use of impasto and the vigorous swirling  strokes that he used to paint Ireland and Celtic mythology.

Death for Only One1937

He painted circus’s, horse racing, music Halls, rugged landscapes and Celtic mythology. 

High Spring Tide by Jack Butler Yeats

His painting became more nostalgic after his wife died in 1947.  He won a silver medal in 1924 for painting at the Tailteann Games. I can’t believe that some critics don’t rate Jack Butler Yeats as being relevent to Irish painting!  Luckily a retrospective of his paintings in 1971 revived his art and reputation.  He died in Dublin 1957.  He is an important artist in Irish Art’s history.

Glory to the brave singer jack butler-yeats 1950

 A short biography of the artist here

Images from here and here and here, here and here

 

Don’t forget to read my BlogSpot interview with Artistatexit0  here