Archive for the ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS Category

Google Doodles Do – Art

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART VIDEOS, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, DESIGN, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on December 30, 2020 by echostains

NEW POST ON BOOKSTAINS HERE

Google Doodles began in 1998 and were unanimated and unhyperlinked until 2010, when Sir Isaac Newton was honoured with the very first animation.

Over 2000 international and regional Doodles have appeared through its homepages, featuring artists, personalities, musicians etc and by 2019, over 4000 Doodles had been created for Google Doodles.

Interactive Doodles made their debut with the 1980s arcade game Pac-Man. Live action video doodles, interactive keyboard doodles, synthesiser doodles, interactive virtual Rubik cubes and games abound. New Google Doodles are being engineered all the time, always topical always innovative.

On the 8th of December, 2011, Google commemorated Mexican artist Diego Rivera’s 125th birthday.  Rivera, who was also an active communist, painted political Murals that helped establish Mexico Mural Movement in the 1920s. He was also  the husband of fellow artist Frida Kahlo, also commemorated by a Google Doodle.

 It’s quite an honour for an artist to be celebrated by Google and there have been some very special and unusual logos in this series.  Though the art is computerised, the artist’s work is still easily identifiable. 

Notable artists who have been celebrated by Google including…. which speaks for itself.

On June 6, 2008, the logo incorporated details from Diego Velázquez’s masterpiece Las Meninas to celebrate the Spanish painter’s birthday (June 6, 1599 – August 6, 1660) here

In 2006, Edvard Munch (born December 12, 1863) was commemorated with a logo incorporating his most famous painting, The Scream here

Vincent Van Gogh received this tribute on his birthday in March 2005 with an immediately recognisable logo here

Please check out all the logos from the Google gallery    Here 

Warhol

Pac- man

Rivera

Kahlo

Velazquez

Van Gogh

Dali

Picasso

Google Doodles more info

Happy Birthday Georges Braque!

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 13, 2020 by echostains

le viaduct de La Estaque

Le Viaduct de L’ Estaque

 

Georges Braque b. Paris, France (1882-1963) was a  painter, collagist and draughtsman, sculptor and printmaker. His major contribution to  Art History is through Cubisim, which he founded and developed alongside   his close association with  Picasso during the 1908-1912 period.

houses at l estaque 1908

Houses at de L’Estaque

He also participated in Fauvism and Impressionism and his work was full of bold shapes and striking colours.  His work during the War though was more sombre and reflective of the mood, but between the war, when the word changed – so did he, using lighter colours, themes and styles.

man and guitar 1911

Man and Guitar 1911

Cubism though can be found in most of this work throughout his career.  He studied painting at Le Havre Academy,  at first concentrating on Impressionism.  Around  1905,  inspired by Cezanne and Van Gogh and their bright use of colours he became a Fauvist painter and exhibited with Henri Matisse and Andre Derain who were also Fauvists.

Braque had his first solo exhibition in 1908 and from 1909-1914 spent time with Picasso  developing a darker colour palette and use of bold line which was to become the Cubism style.

the portuguese

The Portuguese

Cubism challenged presentable form as perspective and conveyed a different way of ‘seeing’, which reflected the ‘modern’ world. Braque incorporated collage innovatively into his work.  His work after the WW1 changed direction again –   reflecting nature and the effect of light, but he never strayed to far from his Cubist style and his  bold use of lines and colour.

girl with a cross

Girl with a Cross

In 1937 he began to add sculpture to his repertoire and did receive some international success when his pieces went beyond Europe and were shown in the USA. He worked after WW2, concentrating on lighter subjects like landscape, sea and nature.  his health was not robust, yet it did not prevent him forming a new art movement of Cubism along side Picasso.

With thanks to WikiArt

More about Braque here

Images from here

Happy Eccentric Birthday Salvador Dali!

Posted in ART, ART VIDEOS, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on May 11, 2020 by echostains

 

Today is the birthday of the Spanish surrealist artist Salvador Dali (1904 – 1989)  As I have already written a post about the artist (here) I thought it might be fun to take a look at the personality of Dali the man – the fun bits.   This video I think shows the artist’s very individuality.  Dali illustrates that he is all things to all people (and especially to himself) as he struggles slightly to understand the English language    There is also a childishness, a naivity which I find very charming about the artist.  I suspect that under all the bluster there may have been a rather shy, quiet person.

Dali is one of those people who can be unintentionally funny – though sometimes you are not quite sure what he intends (he was after all a surrealist so strange behaviour is almost compulsory)  The advertisers certainly got their money’s worth from the dramatic Dali in this short advertisement.  Who knew eating chocolate could be such a surreal experience 😀

The last video shows some of the prolific Dali’s paintings. Where did all the eccentric artists go?  There doesn’t seem to be any to measure up to Dali the man, for his sense of humour, his talent and his bizarre way of looking at things.  What a great artist and character he was!

 

Thanks to  and   and  for the videos!

Surreal Thing Happy Birthday Dali!

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2020 by echostains

Dali is a superb draughtsman.  Some years ago I visited the Dali Universe, County Hall, London. salvador-dali-quotes-famous-best-sayings oneThis 3,000 square metre space housed sculptures, (1935 -1984), lithographs, drawings and wonderful  furniture inspired by Dali: gold and glass objects and  even copies of the famous lobster telephone and the Mae West lips sofa!

There were no major paintings on display, apart from the oil he did for Hitchcock’s ‘1945 film ‘Spellbound‘.  I took great delight in looking through Dali’s drawings which are simply exquisite and show not only his draughtsmanship skills, but how exacting and precise his execution of drawing was. His imagination may have been wild, but his skills struck me as very honed and precise, not something I associate with Surrealism.  Surreal, I know!

 

Dali and his wild cat Babou

 

Too much has been written about this famous Spanish artist: some by myself (please see my earlier birthday posts here and for further Dali eccentricities here ).

Dali loved wild animals.  His favorite pet was a wildcat, an Ocelot, called Babou whom he would take to restaurants, tethering the animal to a table and causing alarm to fellow diners.

The surreal image below shows Dali emerging from the Paris underground taking two Anteaters for a walk (1969).  Andre Breton, (Founder of the Surrealist movement) who was known  as ‘le tamanoir’ – ‘the anteater’)  used this image as bookplates for several books and Dali was to depict the style of the anteater in his famous 1929 painting ‘The Great Masturbator’

Dali taking a Parisian walk with his pets Dali taking a Parisian walk with his pets

 

One of Dali’s famous stunts was staged at London’s International Surrealist Exhibition, 1936 when he gave a lecture whilst wearing a deep-sea diving suit. He very nearly suffocated.  His wild exaggerated gestures were mistaken for his usual amusing form of eccentricity.  Luckily for him a poet, David Gascoyne rescued Dali – with a spanner!

The Great Masturbator 1929

surrealism1938

A mysterious fire broke out in the artist’s bedroom in 1984, fortunately Dali was rescued by a friend, Robert Descharnes.  Dali was returned his beloved  Figueres , Spain (his birthplace), where his friends and  artists looked after him. In November 1988 he went to hospital with heart failure.  On 23rd January 1989, the artist died of heart failure at the age of 84.  He is buried in the crypt in his Teatro Museo in Figueres, much loved and much admired by most artists and non artists alike.

 

Images, with thanks are from here and here     the Ocelot image here, others from here    and here   

For historical characters with unusual pets here

Here’s some stuff you might not know about Dali here

 

Happy Birthday Yves Klein!

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, SCULPTURE with tags , , , , , on April 28, 2020 by echostains

Yves Klein

French artist Yves Klein (b. 1928 – 1962 Nice France) isn’t easy to classify.  Some have said that he was a post-modernist others  a neo Dadaist.  Between the years of 1947 – 48 Klein ‘wrote’ a symphony which consisted of a 20 minute sustained chord followed by a 20 minutes silence.  From 1948 to 1952 he travelled to Italy, Spain and Britain.  Whilst in Japan he became a master of Judo, he was aged 25.  This was considered at the time a great achievement for a westerner’

Yves Klein blue (IKB)

He threw himself into art seriously and held his first private exhibitions of his monochromes in 1950.   Some of his shows showed orange, pink, red, yellow and blue monchromes which Klein thought were misunderstood.  He decided to concentrate only on the colour blue.  Klein patented his own recipe.  This was to become ‘International Klein Blue’ which resembled the blue of the Madonna’s robe  in Medieval paintings, originally made with lapis lazuli.

Klein making a Fire painting

Another show, in 1958 called  La spécialisation de la sensibilité à l’état matière première en sensibilité picturale stabilisée, Le Vide (The Specialization of Sensibility in the Raw Material State into Stabilized Pictorial Sensibility, The Void consisted of an empty gallery space except for a large cabinet.  All surfaces were painted white and on the opening night 3000 people queued up to view the empty room, thanks to enormous publicity!

He decorated the Gelsenkirchen Opera House, Germany with vast blue murals and in 1958 collaborated with Jean Tinguely (Bas reliefs in a Sponge forest) using the sponges he had used to paint his canvases.  These were mounted on to steel rods and set in rocks from his parents garden.

Victory of Samothrace 1962

He also ‘painted’ with gas burners by scorching his canvas.  He  made sculptures, like ‘Venus de Milo’ and ‘The Winged Victory of Samothrace’  which he painted in IKB.   He also made this photomontage called Saut dans le vide (Leap into the Void) which shows appernetly him jumping off a wall.

Le Saut le Vide by Yves Klein

 But he is perhaps most well known for his performance art where he used models as paintbrushes as the formerly dressed audience watch and Klein’s Monotone symphony played!

Yves Klein, Anthropométrie de l’époque bleue

 Here’s the artist himself amidst his symphony and his painted ladies:-

Lots of information about this artist here

and here

Source of images and information here

 Yves Klein becomes the latest artist to be celebrated – there’s many more in my Artists birthdays category!

Happy Birthday J M W Turner – Grand Master of the Elements – not all at Sea

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART VIDEOS, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 23, 2020 by echostains

Today is the birthday of British Romantic Landscape, seascape, watercolourist and printmaker  Joseph Mallord William Turner(b. London 1775 – 1851).  Turner understood the elements, for example when in 1834 parliament caught fire, Turner witnessed it.  He also sketched shipwrecks, storms and other natural phenomena like fog, rain, storms and above all the light and strove to capture it .  He was fascinated by the way light acted upon the elements, giving them a sort of spiritual majesty. Turner loved the sea and it is said that he once had himself tied to a mast of a ship for a few hours to better understand storms.  A romantic tale which is  probably a myth and takes ‘method’ acting to new heights.

Turner was a master of the elements and loved the Dutch seascapes.  He  conveys emotion through his paintings, and an incredible affinity with natures elements.  The sea was in his blood.  He was brought up by the Thames and it would prove to be a great source of inspiration to his work.  In this great video, Turner’s relationship wiith the natural elements is further explained.

A past birthday post about Turner by me here

Another of my posts featuring Turner’s The Fighting Temeraire   here

Video by

Her Aeolian Harp  with thanks!
Turner’s life here and website here

Weep not for me

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2020 by echostains

Pablo Picasso b.(1881-1973 Spain) famous iconic painting ‘Weeping Woman’  is the artist’s protest about the bombing of Guernica.  It was completed in 1937 and  depicts the horror , pain, fear, grief and emotion women were experiencing though the tragic loss of their loved ones in the war.  This is a poem I wrote for a completion that I was running  at the time.  I have plans to bring this feature  back  on Bookstains as they were great fun!

Weeping Woman 1937 by Pablo Picasso 1881-1973

A Weepy Conversation

(Picasso)

Weeping woman why do you cry?
Muse to genius such as I!
Your tears spill down and spoil my paint!
Too much emotion!  No restraint!

I give you fame – yet still you weep!
A bottomless well that runs too deep!
No gratitude – just endless tears
For sharing my creative years!

(Weeping woman)

My precious tears are not for you!
Do not suppose that they’re YOUR due!
Your latest muse usurps my place
These tears are JOY upon MY face!

Lynda M Roberts 2010

 

PS There’s a new poem over on Bookstains

 

Thanks

My earlier posts about Picasso Picasso Pops up

Happy Birthday Dear Pablo Picasso

Happy Belated Birthday Picasso

 

imagehere

Happy Birthday Grant Wood – a slice of American Pie

Posted in ART, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 13, 2020 by echostains

Grant_Wood_-_American_Gothic_-_Google_Art_Project

American Regionalist artist Grant Wood (1891-1942) is known for his paintings of the rural midwest.  He is one of the Regionalists Triumvirate  along With John Stueart Currie and Thomas Hart Benson.   Wood worked in many other media besides paint, including stained glass, wood and metal,  but he is most famous for his 1930 iconic painting known as American Gothic.  This painting is thought to be something of an enigma.  Some critics saw and still see  it as a depiction of small town narrow mindedness.  Wood himself rejected this and maintained that  the painting depicted the pioneer steadfastness of the American spirit – read my other posts about this and the other Regionalists and decide for yourself.

https://wordpress.com/post/echostains.wordpress.com/10930

https://wordpress.com/post/echostains.wordpress.com/7162

 

PS There’s a poem I wrote about American Gothic. entitled American Gothic and the Hot Meat Pie over on my other blog Bookstains

 

Plus There’s a poem about an old chair over on Bookstains herehttps://bookstains.wordpress.com/2020/04/16/i-really-could-sit-in-a-chair-all-day/

Thanks to;

American Gothic image here
More on Grant Wood  here