Archive for leonardo da vinci

Poll Truth or Fiction?

Posted in ART, ART QUOTES with tags , , , , , on June 17, 2011 by echostains

Which of these art quotes speak truthfully to you and which do you disagree with?  Just vote for your favorite and why you disagree with any.  Truth or fiction?  It’s all subjective. 

I agree with Da Vinci who illustrates the difference between poetry and art so succinctly.  

Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.  ~Leonardo da Vinci

But as usual, Picasso has a rather dramatic yet persuasive way with words (but I can’t disagree with him)

We all know that Art is not truth.  Art is a lie that makes us realize truth, at least the truth that is given us to understand.  The artist must know the manner whereby to convince others of the truthfulness of his lies.  ~Pablo Picasso

 I can see where Mattise is coming from – but he makes it sound so boring:-

I don’t paint things.  I only paint the difference between things.  ~Henri Matisse

  I also agree with Degas too.  I have seen a lot of very delightful art made by untrained children and sometimes breaking the rules can free your art. 

Painting is easy when you don’t know how, but very difficult when you do.  ~Edgar Degas

Rouault’s strangled laugh sounds quite terrifying, a kind of torturous escapism  (and one I haven’t experienced…yet) so I would have to disagree with him:-

For me, painting is a way to forget life.  It is a cry in the night, a strangled laugh.  ~Georges Rouault

I have to agree with Claes Oldenburg to an extent, I do like art to do something rather than sit in a museum – but I do like to know where it is for when I want to visit it 🙂

I am for an art that is political-erotical-mystical, that does something other than sit on its ass in a museum.  ~Claes Oldenburg

So, to sum up  Leonardo Da Vinci gets my ‘truth’ vote and poor old Rouault gets my disagreement vote 😉 

Art quotes are from The Quote garden

The puzzle image comes from here

PLUS

 

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Another Poetry Challenge!

Posted in haiku, POEM CHALLENGES, POETRY, WORDS AND COMMUNICATIONS with tags , , , , on September 20, 2010 by echostains

A lot of people go on to my other blog ‘Bookstains’ looking for something to see.  I’ve been putting my own poetry and book reviews on there and just linking to it.  Now I am going to host my poetry challenges on there too!  The Vincent Van Gogh poetry challenge was a real success and all the entries were very individualistic, imaginative and thoughtful:)  I’d like to thank all that joined in – and say that the challenge is  OPEN indefinitely so if you want to join in just click HERE, watch the minute long video and send your poem either in your comment OR just email me and I’ll put it on.  You may copy the ‘Vincent Could have told You’ logo if you want – don’t forget to link to me at Bookstains🙂  It goes without saying that I shall be promoting the challenges after my posts on echostains.

That’s the news – here’s another challenge:-

This poetry challenge is about the smile of the famous Mona Lisa painted by Leonardo Da Vinci between 1503 – 1506.  The lady’s smile (and it has been said that she may not be all ‘she’ seems) is one of the most enigmatic smiles ever painted. The challenge is write a poem or a haiku about that smile, or the lady or the relationship between the artist and the lady.  Here’s an extract of mine :-  to see the rest and to join in with your own, just click the pic and send your poem either in the comment box or by email and I will put it on.  You can use the Mona Lisa pic – but please link back to Bookstains’

Lets have some fun!

The Lips Don’t Lie……

Shut up!

Already

Moaning!

Mona Lisa

As I try to

Keep the brush steady

With my ingenious strokes…

Whilst your countenance

Provokes

Me!

If only……..

(Continued on Bookstains HERE)

original image from here Thanks!

From the mouths of artists

Posted in ART, ART QUOTES with tags , , , on August 9, 2010 by echostains

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon

There have been many great quotes about art and painting.   Sometimes it seems that if you are a great artist it automatically follows that you will utter a clever quote which will be taken down avidly by critics and fans and passed on.  Picasso was aways coming out with profound quotes, they just seemed to trip off his tongue:-

Painting is just another way of keeping a diary”

As a prolific painter, this was probably true.  There is something about being absorbed in a project that keeps the memento up as each experiment leads to a new discovery and the original concept (used as a starting point) starts to take on a completely different personality of its own.  It is the journey which is important to me personally.  A printed out bus ticket (the end product) needs the map to go with it to trace where the journey begins – and how it ends.

Mona Lisa

“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen”

Leonardo da Vinci puts this so succinctly.  He was both profound and clever (though the two don’t necessarily always go hand in hand).  I like the way he juxtaposes poetry with painting, making each lyrical.  Poetry does indeed paint a picture with words in our minds and vice versa.

Great art picks up where nature ends”This quote is by Marc Chagall.  What does he mean by it though?  That art is beyond nature? above nature? unnatural?  or is he trying to say that art transcends nature – that we leave our natures and soar above ourselves like his famous flight paintings!

Chagall image from here Picasso image here and Leonardo Da Vinci here

Quotes from here

Chagall 'flight'

 

 

Plus……… over on Book stains….

Happy Birthday Leonardo and Hart Benton!

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS with tags , , , , on April 15, 2009 by echostains
st-anne-virgin and child -and-st-john-1498

st-anne-virgin and child -and-st-john-1498

Happy Birthday Leonardo Da Vinci 1452 and Thomas Hart Benton  1889!  Two very different types of artists, seperated by 400 and odd years.  One Italian, the other American.  No one can dispute  Da Vinci’s expert draughtsmanship, nor the cleverness of the man, that some say was born before his time because of his inventive ideas.  BUT, I am not very keen on the way he draws womens bodies.  Did they really have masculine bodies in those days?  I don’t know if this is because he couldn’t get hold of women models and has used men instead, but I find his women tend to look very masculine.  Why is this?  When it comes to mens bodies, well the drawings speak for themselves.

vitruvian-man-leonardo-da-vinci

vitruvian-man-leonardo-da-vinci

The other artist who shares his birthday is American Thomas Hart Benton b. 1889 Missouri America.  He was one of what was known as a ‘Regionalist’ painters, along with John Steuwart Curry and Grant Wood. 

thomas-hart-benton

thomas-hart-benton

His paintings and murals comment mostly about the Midwest and are about ordinary people taking care of business and generally getting on with life’ s hardships.  His style is fluid and influenced by El Greco. 

benton_mural-parks-the-circus-and-the-press

benton_mural-parks-the-circus-and-the-press

Muscles on the working man are exagerated, forms elongated.  The style is very individual and recognisable.  Hart Benton also taught art from 1926 – 1941, Jackson Pollock being one of his more famous students.

benton-the-sources-of-country-music-inc-various-cultural-influences-steamboat-banjo-player-train-fiddler-etc

benton-the-sources-of-country-music-inc-various-cultural-influences-steamboat-banjo-player-train-fiddler-etc

Here is a list of links to post I have made so far concerning artist’s birthday.  I have tried to make it a rule that I actually LIKE the artists’ work!   Some artists I do like, I have not included so far, as their birthdays have clashed with something else I was writing about. Some birthdays I have only found out about when it was too late to include them , I mean to rectify this at a later date.

Update 31st December 2009: Has a new Leoanardo painting been found? article HERE

Rubens

Gauguin

Dali

Turner

Van Gogh

Morris

Pollock

Chagall

Kahlo

Modigliani

Degas

Hopper

Duchamp