Archive for the BRONTE BITES Category

Jane Eyre’s beginnings

Posted in BRONTE BITES with tags , , , on July 30, 2010 by echostains

 
 

 

Anyone who has read Gaskill’s Life of Charlotte Bronte will know that Charlotte accompanied her father Patrick Bronte to Manchester when he underwent a successful cataract operation.  Mr Wilson a famous oculist recommended comfortable lodgings which were ran by a former servant of his.

The Salutation

The lodging house has long gone, but the street remains.  The Salutation pub stands facing where the Charlotte and her father stayed.  A blue plaque stares out blankly onto where according to the information Charlotte began her most famous novel Jane Eyre.  This is an excerpt from a letter Charlotte wrote describing her Manchester lodging;-

August 21st, 1846: –

“I just scribble a line to you to let you know where I am, in order that you may write to me here, for it seems to me that a letter from you would relieve me from the feeling of strangeness I have in this big town. Papa and I came here on Wednesday; we saw Mr. Wilson, the oculist, the same day; he pronounced papa’s eyes quite ready for an operation, and has fixed next Monday for the performance of it. Think of us on that day! We got into our lodgings yesterday. I think we shall be comfortable; at least our rooms are very good, but there is no mistress of the house (she is very ill, and gone out into the country), and I am somewhat puzzled in managing about provisions; we board ourselves. I find myself excessively ignorant. I can’t tell what to order in the way of meat. For ourselves I could contrive, papa’s diet is so very simple; but there will be a nurse coming in a day or two, and I am afraid of not having things good enough for her. Papa requires nothing, you know, but plain beef and mutton, tea and bread and butter; but a nurse will probably expect to live much better; give me some hints if you can. Mr. Wilson says we shall have to stay here for a month at least. I wonder how Emily and Anne will get on at home with Branwell. They, too, will have their troubles. What would I not give to have you here! One is forced, step by step, to get experience in the world; but the learning is so disagreeable. One cheerful feature in the business is, that Mr. Wilson thinks most favourably of the case.”

 

What must that street have looked like then?  Oh to go back in time to August 21st 1846 and see Charlotte coming and going from 83 Mount Pleasant Boundary Street!  I, like most people perhaps, always assumed that Jane Eyre was written at the Parsonage in Haworth, but this appears not to be the case.  According to this information, the novel was started at the above address.  Where once stood Mount Pleasant 73 – 93 the back part of the Municipal School of Art stands.

 
 

title page of Jane Eyre

A few days later, she writes thus: “Papa is still lying in bed, in a dark room, with his eyes bandaged. No inflammation ensued, but still it appears the greatest care, perfect quiet, and utter privation of light are necessary to ensure a good result from the operation. He is very patient, but, of course, depressed and weary. He was allowed to try his sight for the first time yesterday. He could see dimly. Mr. Wilson seemed perfectly satisfied, and said all was right. I have had bad nights from the toothache since I came to Manchester.”

Excerpts of Elizabeth Gaskill’s Life of Charlotte Bronte from this site Thanks!

Currer Bell image here

 

 

 

 

Don’t forget to tune into the Arts Web Show  Just Click the Echostains Blog Spotlight to read my interview with the Aspects

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A postcard from Yorkshire

Posted in BRONTE BITES, PAST PLACES, YORK BREAK with tags , , , on May 4, 2010 by echostains

We’re always going off to Haworth, (famous for being the home of the Bronte family).  Nothing much changes in Haworth.  We’ve even stayed there a few times, at the bottom of the hill in a 16th century hotel called Haworth Old Hall.  One time, a bat flew in to the bedroom – so I bit it, and it soon flew away…I AM joking, but not about the bat visit.  Here’s a little slide show I’ve put together using some of our photo’s including York.  This time I have not overladen the slide show with images – so I’m hoping the page will load easier than last time 🙂

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Haworth Old Hall, read about it here

My 500th post

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART PORTFOLIO MY PERSONAL ART, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, BODIES IN PRESERVATION, BRONTE BITES, DESIGN, MY SURFACES, SCULPTURE, TRANSCRIPTION, WEIRD AND WACKY DESIGN with tags , , , , , on April 16, 2010 by echostains

It’s not really my 500th post – that was yesterday, but I wanted to commemorate the Titanic.  I have been playing around with WordPress’ slide show tutorial and I thought what could be more fitting than to try to make a slide show of some of the items I have featured on my blog so far.  Starting in November 2008, I chose a few images from the monthly archives and made this slide show.  All the posts are still there in the archives, just type in the search facility or use the month and year as a clue.  I had great fun making it – it brought back many memories too.  I hope you enjoy watching it 🙂

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Update:  I have had to severely edit the slideshow as it was slowing everything down.  Hope this proves quicker.

My 483rd post is here

Posted in ART, ART HISTORY, ART QUOTES, ARTISTS BIRTHDAYS, BEHIND THE PAINT, BODIES IN PRESERVATION, BRONTE BITES, DESIGN, POETRY, TEAPOTS - A HOMAGE TO UNUSUAL TEAPOTS, WEIRD AND WACKY DESIGN, WRITING AND BLOGGING with tags , , , , , on March 29, 2010 by echostains

where my heads at

Looking back through my past posts, I realised that I haven’t done any summing up since my 427 post.  I like to do this so often as it gives me new ideas and alerts me to areas of the blog which I have either abandoned or neglected.  Some of the categories are outdated now, but I’m still going to keep them, maybe put them under a big generic umbrella – like all the holiday ones in ‘Places’.

gormenghast trilogy

Since my last summing up, there have been a few changes.  For example my other blog ‘Bookstains’ where I am putting my book  reviews (though I’ve not done much of that for quite a bit).  Reading challenges also go on Bookstains.  I have finished both ‘Titus Groan’ and Gormenghast now and am miles behind writing about Titus and my impressions.  I started that blog because of that, but I am enjoying myself writing poetry too much….

I'm no Byron

Having resurrected my interest in poetry, I have now written a few  in different styles and also a bit of Haiku – which I’ve never done before.  The poetry is also on Bookstains’. 

the ones which went before

Another category which I have started is about the preservation of the dead.  Strange, you may think but I am fascinated by all the different ways the body can be preserved and usually by nature.  I am very interested in geneology and have found out so much about myself from looking at my past.  I am the sum total of those who have gone before.  Art quote is another new category and does what it says on the tin.   I’m trying to pick artists who have made a lot of quotes and who I haven’t featured in ‘birthdays’ or ‘Art I LOVE’.

Behind the paint

A very recent category is called ‘Behind the paint’ and takes a famous painting and looks at the ‘clues’ to understanding it.  Teapots still interest me, but unusual ones are getting harder and harder to find.  The weird and Wacky design’ section is quite a popular one.  I like to put the objects into groups so there is at least a cohesive theme running through them.  This takes a bit of time…..

Branwell Brontes Barbers Tale by Chris Firth

Bronte Bites is a section that hasn’t seen much action recently.  I do have new photos which I took earlier this month and which I will get round to putting up on here soon.  I’m still having trouble with the formatting, but I can’t see me changing the theme as I think it suits my subject matter.  Oh well, onwards and upwards, as they say.

Jorvic Calls

Posted in BRONTE BITES, LIVING IN THE PAST: NOSTALGIA, YORK BREAK with tags , , on March 11, 2010 by echostains

shambles york

I will be back by the time your read this post.  I have been away celebrating my birthday.  Where have I been?  Where do you think?  To one of my favorite cities ever York – that’s where!

Alice in wonderland

I never get sick of going to this place and we always eem to find new and exciting things to do.   I will be going to see the new Tim Burton Alice in Wonderland movie in 3D whilst I’m there…well I am back now but this post is scheduled and I haven’t been yet.  Confused?  You will be!  I’ve never seen a film in 3D before so I’m quite excitied.  Someone my husband knows said watching it in 3D was ‘better than real life!’  I thought all life was in 3D? lol!

Haworth Old Hall

Of course I have to spend one night in Haworth again….I think you know why.  As it was such a success last year, we are stopping at Haworth Old Hall and hope to have a super duper time.  We may even encounter the bat we saw last year!

Haworth Old Hall

PS

My new poem on Bookstains is called Last Impression

The Bronte’s Personal effects

Posted in BRONTE BITES, LIVING IN THE PAST: NOSTALGIA, LONDON (JAUNTS), YORK BREAK with tags , , , , , on February 9, 2010 by echostains

George III mahogany desk formerly belonging to Charlotte Bronte

I was interested  to hear about a desk, purported to have belonged to Charlotte Bronte and a Geometry set and art box belonging to Emily.  They were auctioned off at Sotherby’s (see the results on the Bronte Blog HERE.  The owner William Law was a keen collector of Bronte memorabilia and bought directly from Rev. Arthur Bell Nicholls.

Emily Bronte's art box

I did see a writing set  at  the Bronte Parsonage Museum in September last year, but frustratingly I can’t remember whose they were,  (Our trip HERE).  I do think personally owned articles like this set the owner in context and bring their lives alive for Bronte followers.  Sadly, personal Bronteana is very rare now and it is not very often that these kind of items come up for auction.  It does make me think though: how many people  still own Bronteana – that people will never get the opportunity to see?  Perhaps these items shall be guarded and treasured or perhaps future generations will sell them or even just loan  to the Bronte Museum for us all to enjoy, – I hope so..

Bronte writing desk detail

 More of my posts about our trip to  Haworth;=

Staying at Wuthering Heights (as one does)

Did the REAL Charlotte Bronte just Stand up?

Black Sheep Branwell – It wasn’t All Rock and Roll

Haworth STIL Wuthering and Very Much So!

An article by the Yorkshire post about these exciting finds HERE

Or for more Bronteana, why not pop over to the Bronteana Blogspot HERE

The Bronte Parsonage Museum Blogspot has more to say on this and other acquired Bronteana

PS

‘Watched: ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ by Anne Bronte’

Posted in BRONTE BITES, period drama, WATCHED with tags , , , , on January 11, 2010 by echostains

The tenant of wildfell hall

I received 3 Bronte DVD’s for Christmas.  All were BBC adaptations – Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights and ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’.  Of course, I have seen these before when they were shown – or so I’d thought.  ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ starring Tara Fitzgerald, Toby Stephens and Rupert Graves is a highly enjoyable tale of intrigue, cruelty and adventure (it goes without saying that there’s a love interest..).  I must confess to never having  actually finished reading ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ by Anne Bronte.  Every time I have started this book something has happened, in fact the only version I have of it is in that really tiny print that makes my head spin and my eyes cross!  I shall really have to rectify this (Dr my eyes) and get a better version.  In fact I have just decided that I will re read it and although I didn’t managed to finish it – I shall substitute it for ‘The Magus’ by John Fowles for my Flashback Challenge.  I wonder if this is allowed?  Well it is now lol!

anne bronte

Back to the story.  What a remarkable writer Anne Bronte was – quite underrated really.  The tale relates how a cruelly treated wife with an independent spirit is treated by society.  Her loyalty to her dastardly husband is admirable – and he just doesn’t deserve it.  But Helen Graham (Tara Fitzgerald) is no doormat.  Everything she does, she does in her child’s interest.   It is the son that her husband (Rupert Graves) is interested in – what can she do, but follow him try to protect the little boy and prevent him from being corrupted by his cruel father.

Anne's scarborough grave

Helen Graham is a great heroine and played very well by Fitzgerald.  To actually leave her husband and live independently by painting landscapes in Victorian England shows great courage.  It is so sad to see her love for her husband dwindle away into pity and duty as he is dieing.  The contrast between the early love (before the scales have dropped from her eyes) and her sense of duty is quite affecting.  She does get her reward though.  He comes in the guise of a handsome young farmer Gilbert Markham (Toby Stephens) whose tenacity finally pays off.

This is no straight forward tale though.  The tale is told in three parts; the first being Markham’s perspective, next from Helen’s diary (read by Markham) and the last part tells about Helen’s  forced return to her husband and what happens when she does.

Anne is buried at Scarborough, her favorite place.  I have a picture of her grave somewhere