Transcription Journal:Getting under the Surface, pages 1 – 9

transcription-journal-front

transcription-journal-front

This journal is several years old.  It turned into two journals stuck together!  I did get carried away….  The idea was to take a picture from a gallery  and bit by bit, transcribe it into an original work of art.  The idea came from the ‘Encounters’   exhibition I went to see in the National Gallery London 2000.  Each artist chose a painting or sculpture form the National Gallery  to transcribe – with some very surprising results!  Antoni Tapies (see Favorite Art: Art I love) transcribed Rembrandts ‘A woman bathing in a stream’ (1654)  as his piece, and underwent quite a journey to reach his conclusion..

transcription-journal-back

transcription-journal-back

For the cover and back of this journal I used all sorts of media;paper I had made myself,  with ink drawn into, wax dotted over it. There are pieces of velvet, filler and inks (including silver), silver and gold card that I turned metallic using a combination of inks and acrylics.  I have a ‘recipe’ book with how I made these different surfaces, some employ unusual materials, like latex.   I will get round to including these in a different section.

I got off to a false start with my first piece.  The first piece I chose proved a bit limited.  This piece came from the Lady Lever Gallery. Port Sunlight and here is what I wrote on the first page: – (I scanned the journal but it came out blurred)

 

“William Hesketh Lever 1st Viscount Levershulme (1851 -1925) Founder of ‘Lever Brothers’ created the building, the collection and the model village of Port Sunlight.  He was born in Bolton and was an avid collector of art, especially the PreRaphaelites.  He also liked ‘Classical’ artists like Alma Tadema and Frederick Leighton.

The Museum is packed with Lever’s furniture collections, tapestries, needlework, classical statues, wedgewood china, Chinese porcelain and Greek and Roman antiquities.

page-3-transcription photograph montage

page-3-transcription photograph montage

I was drawn to Gabriel Rossetti’s ‘Lute Player’.  I found the painting interesting because the lady  playing the lute is left handed.  This led me to question if the Pre Raphaelite   was using a Camera Lucida.  The date of the painting is 1867,  the picture is not an especially small – nor is it huge.  If Rossetti was using the camera lucida as a tool purely to paint detail, it would seem a pointless exercise, as the gown is hardly sumptuous by Pre Raphaelite standards.

the-lute-player-rossetti

the-lute-player-rossetti

The subject – the lute player has an almost Japanese quality about her.  The way her hair is dressed and the Kimono type robe would suggest this.  Perhaps the painting was commissioned?  The lady pictured is not oriental looking, she may be the wife of some dignitary: though there is no information about this.  This particular picture is not in the Lady Lever guide book, neither is it in the Pre Raphaelite books I have looked at.  So from this, I get the impression that this is not an important work of Rossetti’s – perhaps some sort of experimentation?”

transcription-page-7

transcription-page-7

I then began to experiment with the painting by changing from colour to black and white.  The first figure is a photo copy, the others are painted: –

transcription-pages-8-and-9

transcription-pages-8-and-9

Although this is not my main transcription piece, I did experiment quite a lot with this painting.  I will continue adding the pages as I scan them, until it is complete.  I may at some stage add my main transcription (which occupies the two journals nearly!)  I would do this bit by bit of course.

To be continued……..

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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One Response to “Transcription Journal:Getting under the Surface, pages 1 – 9”

  1. […] I stated off with  the picture ‘The Lute Player’ by Pre Raphaelite Dante Gabriel Rossetti 1867….. see Transcrip… […]

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